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So far it's been great -- beautiful colors, easy to use, everything I expected. But there is ONE problem: When I print glossy or semi-gloss papers, I get white dotted lines in the black and grey areas. I've included an image. Are these what they call "pizza wheel" marks? It doesn't happen with matte paper -- just the glossy. I've tried using "Avoid Paper Abrasion", and tried with different quality settings, and nothing seems to help.

I absolutely love everything else about this printer, but this is a deal breaker -- they're very noticeable to the naked eye even a few feet away under direct lighting.

I dont know enough about Canon's but I thought the had vacuum transport. One thought is that the paper thickness needs to be adjusted.

If that doesn't do it, then a call to Canon is in order. Online civility: Before you press 'Post', ask yourself if you'd say that to someone face to face.

Hi kiefer. As i tried another P with the authorized technician and we both agreed that the problem remains, i am now checking options of getting a refund and look away from Epson, which brings me to the Canon prograf As i can live without the roll feed that the P has but not with pizza wheel marks, this printer looked promissing. And as i have read on reviews and forums, this was supposed to use another paper feed system in order to overcome Epson's deficiency. Hallo, news about wheels marks on Canon pro ?

My canon does marks on dark and glossy paper areas. Marks are difficult to see, but a near-view it can be visible.

To Print JCS Type5 on Epson Pro3880 without “pizza wheel” marks:

Canon says that it is normal and marks should disappear after some days. But it is not true. Any idea? Those look like wheel marks to me, but i am coming from epson world.

On epson i resolved the issue by playing with drying time and media thickness. I guess it comes down to how severe the malfunction is to every printer. Something like how much pressure these wheels apply to paper surface. I started with setting dry time at 60 seconds and worked my way down until marks appeared, i think i ended with 10s. How high did you go? I don't understand manual, that setting seem useful for retard a print for another, not for retard or reduce velocity to eject print.

I think i reached 10s, not higher as i would have to wait for about an hour with single print head pass. I will give it a try with 20s next time i print something and just before going for coffee or work. Excuse me, but I don't understand How I can modify dry setting on my printer? I tried to modify dry setting on canon media config. Normally I use Lightroom to print. It seem that the printer disregard that settings. Hmmmm so two users both with less than a couple of posts, one in Feb and then 2 months ago revived and again a few hours ago by the same reviverShop Greeting Cards Now!

pizza wheel marks epson 7710

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pizza wheel marks epson 7710

Learn about those little pin hole marks you might see running the lenght of your print. Wheel marks have been an issue on certain paper types for many years. They are mostly evident on semigloss and glossy surfaces, and especially on softer coatings. They also are more apparent in the darker colors. There is no fix for the wheels, because they are at the end of the paper feed path and touch the paper regardless of how it's loaded into the machine.

The up-side of the problem is that at viewing distance, and especially when framed, these small marks are all but invisible. Image Above: "Star Wheels" on an Epson inkjet printer. The sit at the end of the paper path, above where the paper exits the printer. Their purpose is to stabilize the sheet and keep it tracking straight through the print process. Red River Paper Inc. Dallas Texas, Prices, specifications, and images are subject to change without notice.

Not responsible for typographical or illustrative errors. Papers with the Archival designtation can take many forms. They can be glossy, matte, canvas, or an artistic product. They are likely to have optical or fluorescent brightening agents OBAs - chemicals that make the paper appear brighter white.Visit our Competitions Forum, where you'll find our monthly competition and other external competitions to enter.

Search for all the latest photography gear and services in our dedicated photography directories. Magezine Publishing Top. Login Join for Free. What is Plus Membership? Something which has bugged me for a short while now. It's a problem that has been present on most Epson printers for quite a while.

When you print a photo onto glossy or other high quality paper, the printer leaves little indentations across the page, where the little wheels in the printer have rolled the paper out. The wheels look like little pizza wheel cutters and are based on the top and bottom near the paper exit area.

The ones on top are problably to blame.

pizza wheel marks epson 7710

I know it's not a major problem, and it does vary from paper to paper since it imprints the ink, i suspect drying times affect it. But - it's annoying me enough now to do something about it. The printer I am using is the Photowhich produces excellent prints.

So, anyone got any ideas on how to rectify it?

I have read some suggestions on the web that say to remove the wheels, but I think they help the paper out of the way of the head, and keep the paper straight etc Pete Plus.

You have found some papers work better than others and changing brand may be your only option. I wouldn't advise removing the wheel! You may be surprised to note that the problem usually doesn't occur with Epson papers. I did notice that the tracks are significantly less visible on Epson paper - and I suspect I have indeed answered my own question! I think it must be due to the drying process, and hence why Epson recommend their own paper as the only brand to use!

It would be interesting to find out if they aren't visible on other types of paper too though. I am about to order some Fuji Multijet Glossy and I wonder whether they will show up on that. I'm not going to remove the wheel, it's probably more trouble than it's worth. I have read that on larger printers this problem is not apparent, due to another method being used to help the paper through, which involves some kind of 'suction' of the paper from underneath!

Steven, I have an epson printer, use Fuji multijet glossy and have not noticed any marks on the print. Funny thing was I was looking at the 'pizza wheels' only yesterday thinking it was remarkable how they don't mark the print. Perhaps it is because the Fuji is a quick drying paper and it is most noticeable on those that stay tacky for a long time???

I really do suspect that the drying time is critical. So I suppose it does pay to pick paper carefully, even if the marks are tiny! Will give Fuji a go I think. So far Kodak paper is the worst - never buying that again - then again it was a bargain offer! I came across this whilst looking for something else and remembered having noticed this thread. When I ordered it I was a bit suspicious but it came in an genuine Epson package.

Find this problem quite annoying, especially as I am sometimes selling prints.Did a search in the forum and only found two Epson P threads where pizza wheel marks were questioned but no answers provided.

Like many I am also frustrated by these marks with the Still think it's a silly design to use a row of sharp metal spurs to hold down a sensitive print. With the P finally introducing a new chassis I'm hopeful this has been addressed with a new feed design.

Sadly, I may be on the cusp of having to replace my as I'm suffering from a weird print head issue with what appears to be my black channel. Rather than spending money or servicing it I would probably be better off replacing it. But persistent pizza marks will temper my plans. Pizza wheels marks will occur only on certain papers with certain coatings.

Not on all papers. You will get them on some Baryta papers with some sheen but hardly ever on Matte or art type matte media. They simply have not come up with something better or more efficient for these smallish printers. I will say that my old RIP didn't do pizza but my does and it's mostly noticeable on dark images on baryta-ish papers only when viewed at extreme angles. They seem to disappear mostly when the print dries down.

My shows pizza wheels on glossy papers like HP Premium Plus. Increasing time between print-head passes reduces the effect. On Other papers, or on longer passes Papers that are bigger than 4x6effectively no marks. D is the first camera with resolution so high that it simply does not matter. Color depth and accuracy in addition to resolution is what makes d great. Resolution alone is over rated.

That is well established, and known not to be common or as severe across all units.Shop Greeting Cards Now! Gift Certificates. Envelopes Museum Board Coatings Lightbox Photography Cards. Learn about those little pin hole marks you might see running the lenght of your print.

Wheel marks have been an issue on certain paper types for many years. They are mostly evident on semigloss and glossy surfaces, and especially on softer coatings. They also are more apparent in the darker colors. There is no fix for the wheels, because they are at the end of the paper feed path and touch the paper regardless of how it's loaded into the machine. The up-side of the problem is that at viewing distance, and especially when framed, these small marks are all but invisible.

Image Above: "Star Wheels" on an Epson inkjet printer. The sit at the end of the paper path, above where the paper exits the printer. Their purpose is to stabilize the sheet and keep it tracking straight through the print process.

Red River Paper Inc. Dallas Texas, Prices, specifications, and images are subject to change without notice. Not responsible for typographical or illustrative errors. Papers with the Archival designtation can take many forms. They can be glossy, matte, canvas, or an artistic product.

They are likely to have optical or fluorescent brightening agents OBAs - chemicals that make the paper appear brighter white. Presence of OBAs does not indicate your image will fade faster. It does predict a slow change in the white point of your paper, especially if it is displayed without UV filter glass or acrylic. Papers with the museum designation make curators happy.

OBA The base stock is acid and lignin free. The coating is acid free. This type of offers the most archival option in terms of media stability over time.

Photo Grade products are designed to look and feel like modern photo lab paper. Most photo grade media are resin coated, which means they have a paper core covered by a thin layer of polyethelene plastic.

Plastic gives the paper its photo feel, stability flatnesswater resistance, handling resistance, and excellent feed consistency. Prints on photo grade media are stable over long periods.

With pigment inks in a protected environment, you can see up to 80 years on-display life. All RC papers are Photo Grade for two reasons. Plastic content is not technically archival by museum standards.

Also, the inkjet coating of all RC papers is slightly acidic. It facilitates instant drying and does not actually change the stability of your inks over time.

Photography, art, and more. Contact Us! Checkout Sign In. Accessories Envelopes Museum Board Coatings Learn about those little pin hole marks you might see running the lenght of your print Wheel marks have been an issue on certain paper types for many years.At a very close at my prints, I can see pizza wheel marks running across my prints.

I have tried everything to sort this out Hi Megan I have anot abut they are very similar. The trick I have read about, but not yet tried, is to use the front tray. Now the front tray is intended for the thickest papers so you will need to use a backer media of the same dimensions as the paper you are trying to print on to increase the thickness.

The front tray does not use the pizza wheels for feeding so there is no chance for marks. Hi again Megan One more thing. The maximum thickness of paper the can handle is 1. Double weight poster board seems about right. Note that paper thickness within the paper configuration menu is specified in tenths of a millimeter 0. Hi again Megan I checked the Hahnemuhle web site for pearl grams per square meter paper and its 0. Adding a second pearl sheet under the first might just work for the front tray total thickness would be 0.

Hi again Megan You shouldn't have to use the printer buttons to set paper thickness, its done from the keyboard using the Epson Print Menu. On my MAC, the paper thickness is set after entering the Epson Print Menu, by choosing "paper configuration" in the pull down menu.

You will find the paper thickness near the bottom of the dialog box that appears. There are a lot of in's and out's to printing so don't be discouraged. Hi again Megan What is the error message you are seeing? Use the printers menu system to turn this setting on. Its something to check. Also my Epson manual indicates the front tray is used for paper thickness from 1.

I had the same problem on pizza wheel marks plus faint white stripes in the direction of the movement of the head despite setting platten gap to "Wider", paper thickness to "5" 0. Having exchanged emails with Hahnemuhle they have advised me that I had a faulty batch of paper which apparently had coating problems.Did a search in the forum and only found two Epson P threads where pizza wheel marks were questioned but no answers provided.

Like many I am also frustrated by these marks with the Still think it's a silly design to use a row of sharp metal spurs to hold down a sensitive print. With the P finally introducing a new chassis I'm hopeful this has been addressed with a new feed design. Sadly, I may be on the cusp of having to replace my as I'm suffering from a weird print head issue with what appears to be my black channel. Rather than spending money or servicing it I would probably be better off replacing it.

But persistent pizza marks will temper my plans. Pizza wheels marks will occur only on certain papers with certain coatings. Not on all papers. You will get them on some Baryta papers with some sheen but hardly ever on Matte or art type matte media.

They simply have not come up with something better or more efficient for these smallish printers. I will say that my old RIP didn't do pizza but my does and it's mostly noticeable on dark images on baryta-ish papers only when viewed at extreme angles. They seem to disappear mostly when the print dries down.

My shows pizza wheels on glossy papers like HP Premium Plus. Increasing time between print-head passes reduces the effect. On Other papers, or on longer passes Papers that are bigger than 4x6effectively no marks. D is the first camera with resolution so high that it simply does not matter. Color depth and accuracy in addition to resolution is what makes d great. Resolution alone is over rated. That is well established, and known not to be common or as severe across all units.

I've never been impressed with paper grab, recognition, tracking on Epson printers but engineering resources are likely not being expended in this area. I guess we should be "glad" Epson issued the 2 new consumer pigment-dedicated printers. In the old days, when you bought from an Epson retailer, one should then have had access to technicians for the adjustments you suggest.

Would we drive a car year after year and never take it in for service? Again, Epson doesn't seem to focus on local service centers. The main office service response is excellent and printers seem to be swapped quite frequently. I had to swap a refurb one time and the response was excellent.

'Pizza Wheel' track marks on Epson Prints

Epson responded to a question on the head issue I'm having with the address of a local service office, whom I contact and have yet to hear back from. That said, these things aren't built to service. They're long-term disposables.